Severe Weather Alert – East Coast of Florida – Wednesday August 20 7am

TROPICAL STORM WARNING REMAINS IN EFFECT
Issue Time: 7:08AM EDT, Wednesday Aug 20, 2008
Valid Until: 7:15AM EDT, Thursday Aug 21, 2008
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TROPICAL STORM WARNING REMAINS IN EFFECT
UNTIL 7:15AM EDT

Hurricane Fay Local Statement National Weather Service Melbourne FL 708 AM EDT Wed Aug 20 2008

Southern Brevard-Indian River-St. Lucie-Martin-Coastal Volusia- Northern Brevard-

… Tropical Storm Warning Remains In Effect…

… New Information… The Center Of Tropical Storm Fay Will Move North Near The Brevard And Volusia County Coast Today And This Evening And Then Is Forecast To Make Another Landfall As It Turns Back Westward Toward The Coast Between Daytona Beach And Saint Augustine Late Tonight Or Thursday Based On The Current Track Forecast. At This Time… The Most Likely Scenario Is For This System To Stay At Tropical Storm Strength If It Stays Close To The East Coast And Is Not Forecast To Move Across The Warmer Gulf Stream Waters.

… Areas Affected… This Statement Recommends Actions To Be Taken By Persons In The Following Coastal Counties… Martin… Saint Lucie… Indian River… Brevard… And Volusia Counties.

… Winds… A Tropical Storm Warning Remains In Effect As Winds Gusts To 45 To 50 Mph Are Still Expected With Rain Bands Around The Center Today As Fay Moves Slowly North Toward Northern Brevard And The Volusia County Coast Through This Afternoon. There Is Much Uncertainty In The Exact Track Forecast But Beyond Tonight But By Thursday Morning Fay Should Turn To The Northwest Or West And Possible Make Another Landfall Along The Coast Between Daytona Beach And Saint Augustine. On This Track… Conditions Will Improve By This Afternoon Across Southern Coastal Sections Of East Central Florida With The Threat For Tropical Storm Force Winds Continuing Along The Volusia County Coast Into Thursday.

… Inland Flooding…

Radar Estimates And Rain Gage Observations Indicate That A Large Area Of 6 To 8 Inches… With Isolated Spots To Near 10 Inches Fell During The Past 36 Hours Along The Coast From Central Brevard County South… And Inland To Osceola And Okeechobee Counties. Minor To Moderate Flooding Occurred Across Much Of This Region.

Scattered To Numerous Showers Will Redevelop Across All Of East Central Florida… With Additional Periods Of Heavy Rainfall. The Flood Watch Continues In Effect.

On The Saint Johns River Between Lake Harney And Astor… There Is Currently No Significant Flooding. The Latest Stage Heights At Lake Harney… Sanford… Deland… And Astor Are All Below River Flood Stage. Rain Totals Along The Saint Johns River Will Increase North Of Lake Harney Today And Tonight. As Of This Morning… The Stage At Astor Is The Closest To Flood Heights… But It Has Not Reached Action Level.

… Tornadoes… As The Center Of Fay Moves North Near The Coast… The Favorable Environment For Tornadoes Will Also Move Slowly Away From The Central Peninsula. A Low Threat For An Isolated Tornado Will Linger Today And Tonight… Primarily Across Volusia And Northern Lake Counties County In Association With Fay.

… Storm Surge And Storm Tide… As Winds Shift To Offshore South Of The Cape… Storm Surge Concerns Will Remain Minimal. High Surf And A High Threat For Rip Currents Will Continue Today. If Fay Restrengthens And Remains Near The Coast… A 2 To 3 Foot Storm Surge May Occur… Mainly Along The Northern Volusia Coast.

… Next Update… The Next Local Statement Will Be Issued By The National Weather Service In Melbourne Around 9 AM EDT… Or Sooner If Conditions Warrant.

For A Graphical Version Of This Hurricane Local Statement… See The Melbourne National Weather Service Web Site At Weather.Gov And Then Click On East Central Florida.

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About lifeinpawprints

I'm a 40-something single mom blogging from the East Coast of Florida, trying to have faith in a world that has not been so kind. Always searching for a creative outlet, be it blogging, photography or crafting things from god-knows-what.

Posted on August 20, 2008, in Life and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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